Tag Archives: street photography

Yum

chavacomiendopizzaizcalli_by_photo_tlacuilopilo-dbwkujyCandid street photography I shot at Guadalupe Lake, Mexico.

This girl is eating pizza by a lake where people gather during the weekends for a stroll, horse-backriding, or enjoy nature’s scenery. During weekdays, people go there to jog or related activities. There are places to eat nearby, especially during the weekends, when people go and visit.

Mexico is the true land of contrasts.

It is ironic that people from all classes share together this huge place, but the lake itself is located in a very upscale residential area — where huge mansions have a view (or even a piece) of the lake. But families from all walks of life gather there to do some picnic, or just relax. Mexico is the true land of contrasts, and this place speaks for itself.

Guadalupe Lake (or Lago de Guadalupe) is located at Cuautitlan Izcalli, in northern Mexico City metro area. A great place to shot sunset photographs, nature pictures, and of course street and candid photos.

Chava mexicana con la boca abierta metiendosela por la boca.

Advertisements

Outside the Museum of Anthropology

Street photography I shot with my J7 mobile phone, outside the National Museum of Anthropology and History. 

The Museum is not only a great visit because of the treasures it houses — literal treasured pieces, monuments like the Aztec Calendar stone, unique statues, glyphs listing kings, and gold craftsmanship — but for its location.

It is a huge and ancient forest designed by Nezahualcoyotl.

At the heart of an upscale area of Mexico City, the National Museum of Anthropology and History rises amongst a forest of trees. On one side of the museum, you have the Chapultepec Forest (or Bosque de Chapultepec). The equivalent of Mexico City’s Central Park, it is a huge and ancient forest — designed by King Nezahualcoyotl of Texcoco for his Aztec Mexica cousin King Motecuhzoma I — which recieves tourists and locals from all walks of life. You can find Mexican families flocking with their improvised picnic a la mexicana, or you can stumble upon elegant couples who march with haste towards some classical music concert. If you like being surrounded with people — and most of all seeing all kinds of them — this is a great spot.

Dotted with posh bars.

On the other side of the museum you have the Polanco district (or colonia Polanco), where you can find not only embassies, high-class hotels, or offices, but also a lot of cafe places, and international cuisine restaurants from around the world. Nightlife may be even more interesting in Polanco, since it is dotted with posh bars and exclusive restaurants.

Our version of the White House but more sumptuous (unfortunately).

The location of the museum is quite interesting not only because of its peaceful trees in the heart of Mexico City’s chaos, but because of its proximity to power. You see, quite near, just blocks away, you have the official Presidential house — sort of our version of the White House but more sumptuous (unfortunately for the Mexican people). We call it Los Pinos, or The Pinetrees (for real). And between Los Pinos complex and the Museum we have the National Auditorium, which is like our Madison Square Garden — all things concerts happen there (as well as quinceañera limos hanging cruising around Reforma Avenue).

Tortas are like burgers, but bigger and with way more ingredients.

Curiously enough, at the immediate surroundings of the museum we can find a lot of snack vendors, selling esquites (corn in a cup), tortas (like burgers but bigger and with way more ingredients), raspas (sno-balls), chicharrones (pork skin), and more. If you’re lucky you may see native dancers — you can’t miss them with all their feathery display.

girl_resting_at_mexico_city

A girl from Nuevo Laredo.

Photo I shot many years ago at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

It is a face I still remember. Just as we are prone to photograph a vivid sunset for our eyes sake into posterity, so I felt with this beautiful girl.

I never knew who she was. It must have been 2006. I was shooting photos at the border city’s downtown. There was some kind of event which for some reason organizers called it a callejoneada. Then I saw her up in the air. Well, she wasn’t literally floating or anything. She was an edecan of sorts for some beer. An edecan is a girl that promotes products, yes, usually on the ground. But for some reason she was up there, I can’t even remember on what.

Whatever she was doing up there she was teasing us with her girly smile and zesty eyes. I wanted to get up close but I also remember why I couldn’t. Believe me when I say I don’t suffer from memory loss (at least not yet). But he encounter had me confused with loss of time, just like abductees describe their horrid experiences with aliens. Except there was nothing nightmarish about this, but quite the contrary.

If you are out there, I would love to know at least who you are. If you know her, please let her know about this mini-quest of mine to find her. She may still be living in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas. Whatever the case, please let her know I took this picture. At least that.

Girl from Nuevo Laredo. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Girl from Nuevo Laredo. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.

Nuevo Laredo / Laredo International Bridge

Photo I shot at Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas / Laredo, Texas.

This is International Bridge #2 at the US-Mexico border. Below streams the Rio Grande (or Rio Bravo as it is known to Mexicans).

Nuevo Laredo and Laredo have several international bridges. Nuevo Laredo has three and Laredo has four — the disparity is because Laredo also borders another state. One of those bridges is used exclusively for trade, where epic cues of transfer trailers cross several times a day in both directions. There’s also a railroad bridge which nobody counts but is there nonetheless.

These bridge, officially known as Juarez-Lincoln bridge (in honor of both presidents that live the same time and also faced divided nations) it is used for cars only. Pedestrians use Bridge #1, the oldest of them all. But in bridge #2, where I shot this photograph, people tend to go and sell whatever they can from pirate DVDs, pillows, figures of saints and like in this cases lollipops. They sell them in the Mexican side of the bridge, which gives them safety from the occasional American officer checking things out.

The US-Mexico border has many realities, and this is just one of them. Unlike what politicians in Washington or Mexico City think every border city or region has its own goodness and difficulties. In this case the Laredos (or Los Dos Laredos as they are also known in Spanish) are a commerce powerhouse. It is considered the fifth most important trade spot in the whole world, and the first in the whole of Latin America. And Laredoans don’t take it lightly (and Nuevo Laredo people too), they have pride on the fact that commerce between North America and Latin America takes place here. This has attracted one of the brightest people but also one of the worst kind at the same time. For obvious reasons in the Drug War, if Laredo and Nuevo Laredo are pivotal in international trade so it will be in illegal activities and smuggling.

US-Mexico international Bridge. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
US-Mexico international Bridge. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.

Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico

Photo I shot at Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico.

A few minutes away from the bustling San Miguel de Allende town is Dolores, in the center of Guanajuato state and in the hearts of many Mexicans. It is after all the birthplace of modern Mexico.

Today is a calm town, but already heading to be a touristy place like its neighbors San Miguel, Leon, or Guanajuato city.

Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.