Tag Archives: photography

A Greek goddess in a French Avenue is one of Mexico’s most cherished image.

Photo I shot at Mexico City.

Reality can and will surpass fiction.

One would think of the Virgin of Guadalupe or the so-called Aztec Calendar, but reality can and will surpass fiction — a Greek goddess in a French Avenue is indeed one of the most cherished and easily identified symbol of the Mexican people. This statue ironically represents the surrealism of Mexico.

The statue was put at the top of a tall column to celebrate in 1910 the 100 aniversary of the Independence of Mexico. Built by then President Porfirio Diaz — considered to be one of the longest serving dictators not only in Mexican history but in all of Latin America. The column crowned with its golden statue is located at the most iconic streets of all of Mexico, Paseo de la Reforma.

Paseo de la Reforma was built by Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico, which under the French Empire’s auspice and patronage he ruled the Second Mexican Empire. It is somewhat of a copy of Champs Elysee and it is said to be a gift the Emperor gave to his wife, Carlotta. The avenue had (and still has) wide streets, rotundas, small gardens, statues, trees — all of which you would find in modern-day cities but back in mid-19th century Mexico City.

The irony goes further, as the name of this avenue was forcibly put by left-winged liberal president Benito Juarez, who not only killed Emperor Maximilian but toppled the Second Mexican Empire and sieged the Catholic Church through his Laws of Reform. The word Reform became linked to his liberal anti-Catholic ideals. So, as a coup de grace, the famous avenue was named Paseo de la Reforma or Reform Avenue.

On top of that, the original statue was destroyed during the 1957 earthquake. Earthquakes are very common in Mexico City, and a new one was built and the tall column reinforced. So far, it has survived the 1985 and 2017 earthquakes.

Finally, the Greek goddess of Victory is known today as an angel, because of its wings. So we have a Greek goddess who became an angel, at a French avenue with an anti-French name, built by a dictator to honor independence — and this is the symbol of Mexico City and one of the most recognized in all of Mexico. I guess the irony of Mexican history speaks itself.


If you would like to read and know more about the intricate history of Mexico you may enjoy reading my novel, Till Stars Shut Their Eyes.


As the day ends, at the land of the Coahuilteca.

Mobile photo I shot while hiking near the Rio Grande river banks.

The land of the Coahuilteca.

Under this vegetation knapped pieces and paleolithic tools lie since ancient times, once used by the native Coahuilteca people who used to live along the Mexico – Texas border.

A vast land which rivers are the only features and places for survival — the few streams one can find, at least. Not a grassland entirely, but also not quite a desert. Life does appear to survive at the land of bushes, cactus, reeds, and tall grass (like in the image).



For hundreds, perhaps thousands of years ago, this area was already a border area. Back then it was the limit where the Comecrudo (Carrizo) people (east of modern-day Laredo and Nuevo Laredo) and the Coahuilteca lived (west of the two cities).

A land where rivers are the only feature you’ll find, if you find one.

Our ancestors once lived along the Rio Grande. After all, this is a land where rivers are the only feature you’ll find — assuming you can find a stream or a proper river. And the mighty Rio Grande (or Rio Bravo, as the Mexicans call it) is the most important river in the part of the world, and one of the most important in the Americas.

Perhaps that’s why they called it Guanapetnan — which means Big River in Coahuiltecan indigenous language. It is quite understandable to recognize it as “the” big river if you ever travel accross all Texas towards it, or from Central Mexico to the north.

A border — back then and now.

There is evidence of antiquity in this area. I have been informed of many findings at the west side of the two Laredos (both sides of the border, that is). And I have identified a large site southest of Nuevo Laredo or South of Laredo, where the ancient ones once inhabited.

Chronicles from post-contact travelers and expeditions refer to this area as a border zone between the Coahuilteca and the Comecrudo nations. Nowadays, Laredo and Nuevo Laredo are still a border region, where the Guanapetnan or Rio Grande separate the United States (Texas) and Mexico (Tamaulipas).

Hiking where the Coahuilteca and the Comecrudo once hiked.

Although it is a rough terrain and the climate can be an issue in Summer or Winter, the experience can be as rich as hiking in a high mountain forest or a secluded beach — trust me, I’ve done it. To me, being as picky as I consider myself, the hiking trails of the border can be a handful. So you can’t be disappointed — unless you don’t like hiking or nature (or bugs, or the sun).

As with all thing in life, if done with caution hiking in the deep of South Texas or the Mexican side of border can be fun. One can see animal life, interesting plants, erosion formations along the creeks, and all kinds of pebbles.

Hiking in the actual Rio Grande river can be difficult if you’re a newbie, not because of its difficulty in terms of the terrain but because of the overwhelming vigilance of law enforcement. Hey, it’s a border, remember that. Don’t get me wrong… there are parks exactly at the Rio Grande — 2 parks, 1 resting stop and 1 golf course at Laredo, Texas, 4 parks and 1 zoo in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, and 1 park at Colombia, Nuevo León.

But hiking actual trails along the Rio Grande can be difficult, desolate, and expect to be stopped by authorities. I have been stopped by authorities on both sides of the border, and they just ask who you are and what are you’re intentions. Of course, if you’re up to no good, you’ll see it with them — in the US side you have the Border Patrol are omnipresent at those trails and parks, and in Mexico side you have the Mexican Army.

If you ask me, the most dangerous thing you’ll face when hiking in South Texas or Northern Mexico is the heat — hands down. And both Laredo and Nuevo Laredo are famous for their infamous hot weather. Winter is very cold, but nothing a good and sturdy clothing choice can help. But the sun of summer literally kills people every year. Again, if done with caution and at certain hours, you’ll be fine.

Female Volleyball of Nuevo Laredo

Photos I shot of Volleyball girls playing at a local league match in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

A city known for other things than volleyball, it lives a strong subculture around this sport — one that trascends class, gender, or even age.


A vibrant subculture.

For many years now, decades, Nuevo Laredo has been known to international news outlets for its gritty violence and the colossal volume of import-export commerce that crosses through this border. And it is true — both statements would even fall short. But none would realize that amid local struggles (sometimes created by international ones) there is a vibrant subculture for volleyball.


An impression that would go down the Rio Grande.

Girls and boys alike immerse themselves (almost religiously) into this sport. Its fast-paced action would seem to require a high degree of agility, quick reaction… and youth. Swiftly, that impression would go down the Rio Grande once you see all the matches — adults, short, or even the elderly join these local league tournaments.


Perhaps the real future for Nuevo Laredo lies in sports.

Perhaps it is a way to escape of all troubles happening at border. After all, Nuevo Laredo and Laredo, Texas are the twin cities located in the epicenter of immigration struggles and the ilk. As ill fated as the future may seem for Nuevo Laredo, perhaps the real future lies in sports such as volleyball. As a way to escape from everyday issues in this bordertown. Or perhaps — and this may have more sense than any of my anthropological dissections — it is the love for the game.


Beautiful hot girls volleyball players. Sexy mexican teen girls, tight butts, asses. Chavas de Nuevo Laredo, bonitas hermosas nalgonas, nalgas, culos, colegialas. 

Never A Blaze Inflamed Loudly Everyday

Never A Blaze Inflamed Loudly Everyday
As my heart yearns for yours to claim
But fate fades away and forbade
In this eternity and plane
Locking our ways to never be the same
Ending all odds for love to flame.

I’ll be the echo that carries your name
Until time wanes dry with the same pain
After meeting you too late in vain,
My cry will be the anthem of shame
Heralding love that never came
Prasing moments we shall never make.


Implied nudity portrait of Addison.

If you like poetry you can read more about tribulations of love in my novel Till Stars Shut Their Eyes.


Beautiful white girl photo, gorgeous face, pretty lady, hot nude nake.

Lecheria, Mexico – The Crossroads of Irony.

Photo I shot at the Mexico City metro area.

A kind of no-man’s land.

An area commonly known as Lecheria, it is a crossroads of paths where highways, public transportation and train routes intersect. A kind of no-man’s land, since it is trapped in the local borders of the Tultitlan and Cuautitlan Izcalli municipalities — where crime, people traficking, illegal migration, and road accients thrive. The blurry jurisdiction in the area has created fertile soil for organized crime and urban decay.

The irony lies in this train tracks.

The irony lies in this train tracks, where most Central American illegals hover before going to the United States, since it is used for most of the import-export flow between Mexico and the US. These old tracks has been used for more than a century to communicate the Mexican capital with the far northern part of the country — and hence, America.

A hub for people who work or study.

Lecheria has its name because there used to be many establishments in the area selling milk many decades ago, way before the urban sprawl reached it. Today, the commuting train has one of its stations here, making it a hub for people who work or study daily in Mexico City proper.

It is a micro cosmos of Mexico in general.

The stark contrasts of Lecheria are too easy to spot. There are decaying factories, warehouses, and improvised wooden slums next to upscale malls, luxurious hotels, a museum, and several restaurants and movie theaters. The mountains — part of the Guadalupe Mountain Range — on one side simple unfinished houses, while on the other towers of coveted departments rise tall. It is a micro cosmos of Mexico in general.


Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico

Photo I shot at Dolores Hidalgo, in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico.

One of the many churches that stand since colonial times — many made with cantera stone, which create the delicate soft color. Also, tiles and other artistic expressions were used to decorate the facade of Mexican churches.

A town populated by talavera ceramic artisans.

While visiting Dolores, I always love to stroll at the local market, where fresh produce and prepared food is available. The outskirts of the town are populated with artisans who work 24/7 on the creation of pottery and home decor based on talavera ceramic. Although tourism is what nowadays is making Dolores stand, talavera ceramic is still by far the main reason Dolores thrive.

Located in Central Mexico, in Guanajuato state. 10 hour drive from the US-Mexico border — give or take.


Why The Watermarks?

For quite a while I have been absent from WordPress, DeviantArt, Flickr, Instagram and other internet outlets and social media, places where I used to regularly share my photographic and artistic works. The main reason was that I was discouraged to find one of my photos being used by a company without asking me permission — let alone letting me know.

Thieves come in all sizes.

After finding my photo being used (((in all glory))) in their website, I immediately contacted them. I never jump into conclusions, after all, maybe someone thought it would be a naive idea. So I figured, better to ask. And indeed I ask them, and what I thought would be a normal phone conversation swiftly escalated into an all-out confrontation.

Not only they denied it, but they questioned me how would I prove it was my photograph. I should tell you my photograph was heavily edited and cut so that my signature wouldn’t be visible. I was appalled by the bravado with which that fella (((with quite a manlet’s voice))) attacked me — a clear sign they knew they were wrong. It is a big company, and for some reason we still believe that they can’t be thieves. This should show — once again– that thieves come in all sizes, shapes, and forms.

Did anyone catch his name?

My resolve was to protest with bigger and louder watermarks. Something that would infuriate people, because after all that is what protests are about — aren’t they? Or perhaps I slept during my Anarchy 101 classes.

Any how, people did get angry with my watermarks. Apparently I did touch a fiber amongst photography and art lovers. At some point in Imgur people flooded with comments criticizing the watermark, instead of the work itself. Their attention turned towards the watermark signature en masse — well not literally, but you get the point. The joke that struck me the most was when an imgurian said, “Did anyone catch his name?”

The internet can make you believe you’re crazy.

At that point I decided to not post pictures anymore, photography or art-wise. Which now I know I was wrong. But at the moment I had an urge to disconnect to keep my sanity. Yes, the Internet can make you believe you’re crazy. And crazy things I did — like not sharing my art and photography any more.

Watermarks make them uncomfortable.

Slowly but surely I began to share again at Instagram, and for the past weeks at DeviantArt. Now I am returning. And we’ll see what new adventures my photographs take me to. Many people ask me about stories or anecdotes when taking photographs, especially street photography (because it may seem more invasive). I always tell people the backlash, the ignorant critique, and the raising eyebrows are what have got me more in trouble than the actual shooting of the picture. And now… the watermarks. Apparently people have no issue with nudes, candid shots, critter close-ups, or poverty pictures I document — watermarks make them uncomfortable. Well, here you go — kryptonite for our times. I always believed kryptonite was telling the truth, but oh well.