Tag Archives: documentary

Female Volleyball of Nuevo Laredo

Photos I shot of Volleyball girls playing at a local league match in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

A city known for other things than volleyball, it lives a strong subculture around this sport — one that trascends class, gender, or even age.


A vibrant subculture.

For many years now, decades, Nuevo Laredo has been known to international news outlets for its gritty violence and the colossal volume of import-export commerce that crosses through this border. And it is true — both statements would even fall short. But none would realize that amid local struggles (sometimes created by international ones) there is a vibrant subculture for volleyball.


An impression that would go down the Rio Grande.

Girls and boys alike immerse themselves (almost religiously) into this sport. Its fast-paced action would seem to require a high degree of agility, quick reaction… and youth. Swiftly, that impression would go down the Rio Grande once you see all the matches — adults, short, or even the elderly join these local league tournaments.


Perhaps the real future for Nuevo Laredo lies in sports.

Perhaps it is a way to escape of all troubles happening at border. After all, Nuevo Laredo and Laredo, Texas are the twin cities located in the epicenter of immigration struggles and the ilk. As ill fated as the future may seem for Nuevo Laredo, perhaps the real future lies in sports such as volleyball. As a way to escape from everyday issues in this bordertown. Or perhaps — and this may have more sense than any of my anthropological dissections — it is the love for the game.


Beautiful hot girls volleyball players. Sexy mexican teen girls, tight butts, asses. Chavas de Nuevo Laredo, bonitas hermosas nalgonas, nalgas, culos, colegialas. 


Lecheria, Mexico – The Crossroads of Irony.

Photo I shot at the Mexico City metro area.

A kind of no-man’s land.

An area commonly known as Lecheria, it is a crossroads of paths where highways, public transportation and train routes intersect. A kind of no-man’s land, since it is trapped in the local borders of the Tultitlan and Cuautitlan Izcalli municipalities — where crime, people traficking, illegal migration, and road accients thrive. The blurry jurisdiction in the area has created fertile soil for organized crime and urban decay.

The irony lies in this train tracks.

The irony lies in this train tracks, where most Central American illegals hover before going to the United States, since it is used for most of the import-export flow between Mexico and the US. These old tracks has been used for more than a century to communicate the Mexican capital with the far northern part of the country — and hence, America.

A hub for people who work or study.

Lecheria has its name because there used to be many establishments in the area selling milk many decades ago, way before the urban sprawl reached it. Today, the commuting train has one of its stations here, making it a hub for people who work or study daily in Mexico City proper.

It is a micro cosmos of Mexico in general.

The stark contrasts of Lecheria are too easy to spot. There are decaying factories, warehouses, and improvised wooden slums next to upscale malls, luxurious hotels, a museum, and several restaurants and movie theaters. The mountains — part of the Guadalupe Mountain Range — on one side simple unfinished houses, while on the other towers of coveted departments rise tall. It is a micro cosmos of Mexico in general.


Mexican girl dancing at gas station.

Photo I shot as part of documenting trades of Nuevo Laredo.

In the Mexican side of the US-Mexico border there’s a niche for young girls as dancers at gas stations or convenience stores. Usually known as edecanes, these girls usually work during weekends. Just before the sun sets one can see them getting ready with their huge speakers and strident music.

Many dancers represent a certain brand, beverage, or beer, although generally they are present to pull customers to that particular convenience store. Does it work? Who knows, because people have to go to convenience stores anyway — don’t they?

This culture of girls dancing in the streets with few clothes — literally — does not exist in Central Mexico or Mexico City. Habits and way of seeing things do change from region to region here in Mexico (just like the American South is so different from say, the West Coast).

Mexican girl dancing at gas station. Copyright 2013. Miguel Omaña. Mexican girl dancing at gas station. Copyright 2013. Miguel Omaña.