Tag Archives: anthropology

Human Era Calendar Date link.

This is a page I created with programming code I wrote showing today’s date according the Holocene Calendar, also known as the Human Era calendar.

Click the image and see today’s date according to the Human Era calendar.


The Human Era calendar:

  • Measures time since Humans began their era on this world.

It counts time since the neolithic began, from which our technological prowess increased exponentially — from the knapping of stone tools and the first construction ever built to our days of quantum computers, CRISPR genetic editing, and the Internet.

  • Negative years are eliminated.

The famous B.C.E. (before current era) years are negative, making it confusing in historical and geological terms. Such difficulty discourages people from fully understanding that huge period of time.

  • It marks a common starting point for the human species.

Whatever race, nationality, or religion, this calendar would be appropriate for everyone. And maybe — just maybe — this would encourage a grater unity amongst the peoples of the world.

  • No major changes except adding 10000 years to our current years.

Contrary to other more precise calendars such as the Mayan Long Count calendar or traditional calendars such as Chinese calendar, the transition would be more smoothly (computer, economic, government and culture-wise) without affecting current months, days, days of the week. The importance is given to add a 1 to the left of whatever Gregorian calendar we use (like our birthdates, anniversaries, official deadlines, and the such).


This is a personal effort from my part to bring awareness of this option to the world. An option to make the people important to this world, and unity as the option to face the future.

For any technical issues or glitches on that website, please let me know.


Female Volleyball of Nuevo Laredo

Photos I shot of Volleyball girls playing at a local league match in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

A city known for other things than volleyball, it lives a strong subculture around this sport — one that trascends class, gender, or even age.


A vibrant subculture.

For many years now, decades, Nuevo Laredo has been known to international news outlets for its gritty violence and the colossal volume of import-export commerce that crosses through this border. And it is true — both statements would even fall short. But none would realize that amid local struggles (sometimes created by international ones) there is a vibrant subculture for volleyball.


An impression that would go down the Rio Grande.

Girls and boys alike immerse themselves (almost religiously) into this sport. Its fast-paced action would seem to require a high degree of agility, quick reaction… and youth. Swiftly, that impression would go down the Rio Grande once you see all the matches — adults, short, or even the elderly join these local league tournaments.


Perhaps the real future for Nuevo Laredo lies in sports.

Perhaps it is a way to escape of all troubles happening at border. After all, Nuevo Laredo and Laredo, Texas are the twin cities located in the epicenter of immigration struggles and the ilk. As ill fated as the future may seem for Nuevo Laredo, perhaps the real future lies in sports such as volleyball. As a way to escape from everyday issues in this bordertown. Or perhaps — and this may have more sense than any of my anthropological dissections — it is the love for the game.


Beautiful hot girls volleyball players. Sexy mexican teen girls, tight butts, asses. Chavas de Nuevo Laredo, bonitas hermosas nalgonas, nalgas, culos, colegialas. 

Butterflies – The Souls of Ancient Warriors

Photo I shot at Xochitla, Mexico.

For thousands of years native people in what is now Mexico, Central America and Southwestern United States had stories, epic accounts, and even religious beliefs regarding animals. One of such admired animals was the butterfly.

They revered nature almost to religious levels.

Who knew that people who admired fierce jaguars, stealthy snakes, and mighty eagles would have butterflies in high esteem — from all animals. And yet it is true. Once you know the ancient lore and culture of the indigenous people you can easily understand. For their reason in life wasn’t all about war — or inexistent human sacrifices. They revered nature almost to religious levels, or even more!

Such a society would respect the delicate.

The societies of Ancient Mexico were composed of poets, artists, performers, mathematicians, astronomers, dancers, and great teachers — but you won’t hear this in any Discovery Channel or National Geographic documentary (since they either lack historical knowledge or work on a biased agenda). Such a society would know and respect the delicate, the artistic, and the beautiful. We know that because their poetry and way of talking is full of empathy and care. They were no blunt warriors only — the vast diversity amongst the ancient native peoples of the Americas is not only impressive but still unknown.

Warriors carried a big butterfly symbol.

Motifs of butterflies adorned clothing capes, artisan’s clay figures, and even the glyphs written on deer hide or amatl paper by scribes. In Tula, Hidalgo (known back then as Tollan Xicocotitlan), the capital of the historical Toltecs, warriors carried a big butterfly symbol over their chests as part of their military attire. Also printing seals — a great tradition in Ancient Mexico not so much discussed — were also made with various butterfly shapes and sizes.

There are still traditions to honor the deceased.

But beyond the visible, butterflies were part of the ancient’s stories and beliefs. For instance one of the most famous one, which still survives to our times: butterflies being visiting souls. Although Day of the Dead traditions has been quite tainted and manipulated for centuries — I.E. Disney-Pixar’s Coco — there are still some original traditions who once honored or remembered the deceased. The butterfly story is one.

Now they come to bring joy to us, and for us to honor them.

It is said that if you see a butterfly pass by or visit you, it is in reality the soul of an ancient warrior visiting you. And it is probable that person died in battle to became a beautiful butterfly in the next life. We know from Tula the connection between warriors and butterflies, probably as if they knew that if they were to die in the fight a chance to become a peaceful and delicate butterfly awaited. So people respected and protected butterflies, because they may even have been a father or a sibling who perished under the spears and arrows at the chaos of the battlefield. Now they come to bring joy to us, and for us to honor them.


How can a pompous LeBron James be a role model to society?

Please explain to me… how can an egotist still be considered a role model after not delivering his own boastful expectations of himself?

Looking up to someone who doesn’t walk the talk.

Let’s face it, whether we’re talking about a political officeholder, a scientist, or a basketball player, one who doesn’t walk the talk is (or should) not be taken seriously. That’s how incumbent politicians are defeated in elections and researchers deprived of grants. But what to do with public figures like LeBron James who may be more of a role model to kids and society? He sure lost the NBA Championship to Golden State Warriors.

One thing is individualism, and another hollow vainglory.

A boastful, self-centered man (forget his a well-paid athlete, if you can) who considers himself the best in the world (literally) yet constantly failing to achieve his only goal in his line of work. People may come up with tons of stats data about how he’s good (and as his fans say, his teams are not). But no one can explain why groundless individualistic narcissism can be admired over and over. Don’t get me wrong, one thing is the individualistic effort to overcome obstacles — into which for good or ill Western culture has fostered — and another having a hollow vainglory.

One day we will forget what victory or advancement was.

A self-declared historian of basketball, LeBron James has called himself the best in the world while blaming his teammates (or fate) after each loss. Last time I checked, that’s not role model material. Sorry, but there are far better examples of people who have excelled through adversities and still managed to retain a healthy dose of sober composure. It is dangerous for a society to lookup to people like him, or else one day it will be a norm to boast about oneself while not showing it. We will become the “I’m the best but you don’t know it yet” people instead of the “I will work hard to become the best” kind of thing. With faux heroes omnipresent in our daily lives that one day we will become so fake, that advancement and victory will be blurred to mere boastful words.

Let’s just hope real role models don’t become extinct.

So much role models, inside and out of the NBA, and we tend to pick the worst of them all. We as a society need to remember what it takes to be a winner, a victor, an achiever — and if not, there are still very good examples nowadays. Let’s just hope those role models don’t become extinct by the sea of vanity.