Category Archives: politics

3 reasons that make Mexico’s “No” to Trump’s wall an irony.

After much delay the Mexican government has officially spoken about Donald Trump’s proposal of Mexico paying for the wall at the border. Luis Videgaray, one of the strongest and loyal men of the Mexican president, has declared that not “one peso” will be spent on the wall using Mexican people’s money.

Videgaray is the Secretary of Finance in Mexico, all things money goes through him. And there resides the irony of his words – his office and himself have been involved in major corruption controversies. After all, he handles public finances – making Videgaray the man with which Trump will have to face inevitably (If the Donald secures the US presidency, of course).

3 major corruption scandals that make Videgaray’s “no” to Trump’s wall an irony.
Bear in mind the word major, since more allegations abound.

1.

Dubious Mexican presidential campaign money.

As Enrique Peña Nieto’s strong man during the campaign of 2012, he helped secured big-time donors in order to make a dent on then favorite leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. As pressure mounted from special interest groups and the media, Videgaray made cash began to flow. The way he did it is still a polemic debate from Mexican opposition.

Videgaray secured impressive donations from Soriana market store chain (our equivalent of Wal-Mart). It was documented at the time how Videgaray’s party PRI distributed Soriana gift cards with petty cash in exchange for votes. Their campaign also received money from abroad who had interests in not letting Obrador turning Mexico in the next Venezuela. So most of the money he raised was illegal by Mexican electoral law.

2.

Lavish mansions, dirty deeds.

A contractor with shady links to the President of Mexico, and especially Videgaray allegedly bribed them with vast lands and mansions that would make the late Queen of France look modest. Videgaray has his own luxurious mansion at Malinalco small town, while the President and his curvaceous wife have their colossal mansion in the upscale western Mexico City side.

The Mexican First Lady has already explained on national television that they pay with their own money their brand-new house, even when their children (the ones who called poor Mexican people disgusting) go for safari at Africa and do shopping sprees in Beverly Hills. The opposition thinks Videgaray did a good job covering whatever muddy deeds they have done with those contractors.

3.

Controversial energy deals and taxes.

Videgaray has pushed every year for heavy taxes upon an already burdensome Mexican people. He says results will be seen on the long run, but on the short run he has been surrounded with shifty characters involved with corruption in Pemex (the state and only oil company) and other Energy sectors. Many ask where are the taxes he so vehemently rooted for are going. Utility bills are more expensive than ever in Mexico, but it seems that money is going to some pockets – but whose?

Mexican leaders soft spot is not nationalism (we’ve been invaded since 1521) or people’s dissent (hey, they let Texas go after all). All that Mexican government officials and White Mexican elites are money. As simplistic as it sounds it is what has brought misery to Mexico for centuries.

Now that Donald Trump is threatening the status quo not only in America but also in Mexico, Mexican leaders might think it is more troubling to give money for Trump’s wall than to keep purchasing mansions, silence of obscure deals, and political campaigns. If you summed it up, the wall would be a cheaper way out of a spat with Trump than what their mansions cost.

Opposition leaders calculate 10% of public finances in Mexico’s government goes to documented corruption – stealing or bribery. But Videgaray insists he will not pay a single peso from Mexico’s public finances. You see the irony, or at least the moral hypocrisy?

How former Mexican president Fox’s words against Trump exposes way of doing things

The manner Vicente Fox, former president of Mexico, expressed his disapproval of Donald Trump’s wall exposes the irate, compulsive, and demeaning ways Mexican leaders have ruled over the Mexican people for centuries – but barely no one in the world noticed.

Even though Fox is one of the few (very few) Mexican presidents actually elected by the people, a dictatorial way of doing government has endured to our days. If not ask the Texans, who noticed this issue and did not wait to separate from Mexico — or unsuccesfully Yucatan, the Rio Grande Republic, Guatemala, and Chiapas. Many have pointed out that Mexican presidents rule with insults, racism, bullets, and dangerous improvisation.

Only words.

Many would say Fox leveled in tone with Trump. But bare in mind that Trump is a candidate in his own party. Fox has already been the ruler of a 100 million Mexicans plus the 10 million illegals in the US he wanted during his campaign to vote for him so he could bring them back. His words have always been that, words. He made wild promises of change, democracy, and creating jobs so that people wouldn’t have a need to migrate to the United States. The result was an utter sham.

Not only he didn’t bring illegals back to Mexico, but his only economic goal of 7% growth was a flop. So Mexicans fled, not only to the US but elsewhere.

With Mexican economy stalled Mexican Congress became overrun by opposition, so that Fox became a sitting duck – our Mexican version of Obama if you will (except a right-winged Obama). Fox started a dirty media campaign against a promising left-winged Mexico City mayor, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. Insult after insult, a one-sided war of words against a man who was the de facto candidate for all leftist parties. He even orchestrated his political demise through shadowy maneuvers, which made Obrador even more popular. Sounds familiar?

The dawn of war.

Fox’s legacy are not just words and his flamboyant insults, but his ineptitude to rule a nation. The job is simple, but his obsession to destroy Obrador and his “populist” menace blinded him to urgent matters in Mexico. After all, the country is vast in territory – danger brewed in its northeastern corner.

In 2003 new drug cartels appeared in Tamaulipas. Yes, there were drug cartels in Mexico, but this new breed stormed in with freighting military tactics and such hatred against the population as a whole. Previous cartels have only operated against Mexico military. Many of the old cartels faded under the blood-thirsty new ones, who executed people in the streets and performed terror attacks at public places. Other cartels adapted at such wrath, such as El Chapo. But Fox did nothing, for words and insults could not make this away.

As his non-democratic predecessors of the 20th century, he controlled the media, so “nothing happens” was the motto. We don’t have to be historians to know how this developed, and how it has prompted Trump to build the wall at the border.

Lack of policy

I’ve come to the conclusion that Mexican presidents become dictatorial because they have no policies or ideals. Mexican presidents (and emperors) with clear policy making ideals die or are killed. After all, we Mexicans have lived under dictators under 500 years. Invaded by the Hispanics, for us government is one person laying down our destinies for his personal gain.

There is a (not so unreal) joke about Mexican presidents here in Mexico: “What time is it” asks the president. A lackey answers, “Whatever you want it to be.”

This notion that Mexican presidents can get away with murder (literally) is engraved in all Mexicans. This makes them crazy with power. Not one (except for a few cases, again) have they used their kingly power to do good.

Everything has to do for personal glory or business. There is no government policy ever made that the president in turn doesn’t have an economic or business advantage. Thus, a systematic machine of corruption, racism, and gestapo-like police is in place. American criminals always flee to Mexico because there is a sense of lawlessness when it actually has harsh non-sequitur laws… unless you are out of sight of the government (Federal, state or municipal).

One thing is the leadership

Just as Americans as uncomfortable on how things are run in Washington, so the majority of people in Mexico thinks of the Mexican government and special interest groups. Did you know that after the Arab Spring young Mexicans rose against the government in social media? And did you know that the internet was almost, almost in peril of being shut down in all of Mexico? Did you know there are political prisoners right now? I’m not talking about Cuba but Mexico. Did you know the upscale children of Mexican politicians are right now vacationing on yachts in Europe or doing safari in Africa?

Please, dear Americans or foreigner — whether you’re left or right-winged, liberal or conservative – one thing is the corrupt and racist Mexican government, politicians and criminals. Then there’s the rest of us. Whatever Mexican leaders say or do is in their interests, not in our name. And remember they have Mexican and Spanish-speaking media under their sleeve for that same reason.

Riots in Mexico’s midterm elections annuls elections in Tixtla

Happening now.

In Tixtla, Guerrero, as seen in the video, widespread riots, protests and violence against polling stations has forced to government to declare the election annulled in that city.

Many more riots and forced closure of polling stations have been reported via social media in different states.

These protests come after 43 students were disappeared, possibly killed, by the government. Mexicans are disenchanted by the way the government of Enrique Peña NIeto weakly handled the Drug War violence in one hand, and the stern decisiveness against civilians in the other. Democracy has become just a word for everyday Mexicans, while politicians cling to power amid a wave of corruption, sex scandals, and violence.

This by itself is historic. If the INE (National Electoral Institute) decides to keep annulling more cities or even states, this will be unprecedented. People are rising to stop what they call “the farce” of voting. “They always put who they want”, said many people as they stormed into polling stations in Guerrero, Oaxaca, Morelos and Mexico City polling stations.

Mexico’s most dangerous elections to be held in a few hours.

In a couple of hours Mexico will have the most dangerous elections in the worst political climate ever. A complicated situation that has been amounting for the last 500-plus years. Midterm elections are tomorrow morning in a nation disenchanted by democracy, the worst approval for a president, omnipresent state-sponsored racism, followed by massacres and protests.

The fail state environment is undeniable thanks to social media.

It is the toughest moment of Mexico and yet the government and electoral body are playing it 20th century style, unwilling to recognize people are more knowledgeable thanks to social media and the internet. The monolithic Televisa, ever-present TV network was once responsible for the cover-ups of much of the governments wrongdoings. Most notably the 1968 student massacre, the 1970’s “dirty war” against communist rebels, the 1980’s economic debacle, the 1990’s political assassinations, and the 2000’s drug war. But now, in the 2010’s the fail state environment is undeniable thanks to social media, internet, and foreign media coming into the country by cable or internet. Televisa and the government are still operating as in the 1970’s, having major headlines of troubles in Venezuela, riots in the United States, and the Middle East, but oddly in our facebook and twitter accounts Mexicans are sharing and commenting on news generated by citizens itself.

Democracy is undermined in Mexico.

The key is information. For so long there has been an institutionalized effort to block information from the common Mexican. They have gone from the patriotic extremes, like prohibiting the old movies that recounted the El Alamo battle in Texas, to the annoying “nothing is happening” ideal of a make-believe nation. But now almost anyone who can fairly handle a mobile phone with camera can record video or photographs of things happening in Mexico — from police corruption, politicians sex escapades, and worldwide violence (literally many are battles in the drug wars). If not, we can see it at Fox News, CNN, or other media. This has undermined president Enrique Peña Nieto and his presidency and the belief of democracy.

A few hours ago the military and federal police were deployed to four states awaiting violence.

Now many municipalities and states are tonight in a true state of rebellion. A few hours ago the military and federal police were deployed to entire states like Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas, and Puebla. Teachers, students, natives, and community vigilantes have stormed in the last days into INE (National Electoral Institute) facilities, offices, and warehouses were electoral material is kept. Some political party offices have been burned in Chiapas. INE offices have been bombed in Puebla. Tonight there is no access to many towns in Oaxaca and Guerrero, taken by the people itself to impede elections from happening. In an electoral office in Oaxaca the soldiers fled from the people who were burning ballots. People in Oaxaca still reported in the afternoon many helicopters continually hovering over cities and towns, as if prepared for the worst.

It may not be as fast as the Arab Spring, but the uprise in Mexico is happening.

We don’t know, and I guess no one can know, what will happen. This never happened in Mexico. Something similar, but not so grave actually, started what we all now know as the Mexican Revolution. If you know Pancho Villa, you know something about that uprise that exploded in 1910. 105 years later here we are. Many people are actually surprised there hasn’t been a proper revolution in Mexico. Although after the drug cartels took hold of many places, citizens rose in vigilante groups against them and the government alike. Many towns in Michoacan are self-ruled, and many more in Guerrero state want to be the same. It may not be a revolution that may start as fast as the Arab Spring, but slowly but surely things are becoming more violent in a nation that has endured hardships, violence, and poverty.

How can state-sponsored racism in Mexico exist in the 21st century?

Please explain to me…

How can state-sponsored racism in Mexico (and the rest of the world, for that matter) exist in the 21st century?

A few days ago an audio recording emerged showing how a high Mexican official insulted the way of talking of indigenous native Mexica, specifically those from Guanajuato state. Lorenzo Cordova, head of the National Electoral Institute mocked a Chichimec leader and even compared his interview with their leader as a laughable Lone Ranger situation.

Lorenzo Cordova refuses to resign after racist remarks. Lorenzo Cordova refuses to resign after racist remarks.

Lorenzo Cordova is not only a high official within Mexican politics, he’s a key person. The Electoral Institute, INE, is the body that set federal elections nationwide. This institute was created after a much debated presidential election in 1988. To avoid a violent uprise the Mexican government allowed the opposition motion to create an independent-ish body to establish federal elections, oversee political parties, and hence declare winners in an allegedly democratic manner. In the 1990’s the then called IFE worked, so much that after 71 years of the ruling PRI party the opposition won the presidency in 2000.

A person invested to protect plurality is ready to provoke upheaval.

But now the Electoral Institute is under fire. Amid a political crisis in Mexico, these recording of the highest official representing democracy in Mexico insulting natives have spurred heated reactions from the people and obviously from yours truly. How can someone who is supposed to guard democracy and equality in modern-day Mexico operates with such bigotry? It is hurtful that a person invested to protect plurality in a wounded nation that strives to overcome a past of confrontations is ready to provoke such upheaval with such childish remarks.

Like in colonial times, empowered white Mexicans rule with cynicism over the masses.

He’s been called to resign, and naturally he refuses to leave. This white man who rules over the “democratic” body mocks the origin and way of life on millions of Mexicans, and insults whatever little hope remain for democracy in this nation. People are disenchanted — and with good reasons with the racist actions of Mexican ruling class. This sounds exactly as colonial times, where the empowered white Mexicans ruled with cynicism over the masses of natives. Not all white Mexicans should be stigmatized, after all a white priest from the same state Lorenzo Cordova insulted rose to war to declared Mexico an independent nation from gachupines (a name given in colonial times to Hispanics mainly from mainland Spain). Perhaps the gachupines are still amongst us in Mexico, not living an honorable life, but a disgraceful life driven by intolerance. Will such reckless attitude not leave Mexico but take root and eternize into 21st century Mexican social landscape?