Category Archives: photojournalism

Remember, remember, the 5th of November

Photo I shot at Mexico City.

Remember, remember, the 5th of November.

There is a crisis with police worldwide. It’s not just a one-nation phenomenon.

Civilians are having trouble with police — aggressive, authoritarian, corrupt, insensitive, and racist. Yours truly too. It is not an issue of complying or not anymore. It is not an issue of criminal activity anymore. It is about undermining democracy and freedom (if any).

For those of us who have had issues with police for NO reason is frustrating for other police or authorities to understand. Especially here in Mexico, where laws are only a list of good will.

This ends up ultimately with world governments, they inability to see the issue. We ended up in a police state world, where the Internet, free speech, or even carrying a camera at a demonstration is far worse offense than rape, kidnapping, or mass murder.

Criminals all around the world are getting a nice treatment — warlorlds, drug pins, and mass shooters. We the people have become the scapegoats for the blunt inefficiency of police. Their frustrations vent on us.

We should remind the police (the bad apples that is) that we are the more. That they work for us. That they serve and protect us, not themselves. The moment we begin to do this reminding to police corporations around the world, the moment democracy has failed — though we need to do something to mend it.

Unless you don’t believe in democracy, the police should be held accountable for their actions — the good and the bad. Good actions should be rewarded, yes. Bad actions from police should have the most severe repercusions.

If you’re interested in how a system becomes rotten check out my novel Till Stars Shut Their Eyes, and see how Yacanes and Atotoztli defended their love in Ancient Mexico against the actions of the High Ruler’s police.

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Family at the Mexican border

Photo I shot at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

While interviewing him, this man worked on construction structures. These structures hold cement columns, and also seem to hold the survival of this family.

After giving me permission to take portraits of him working and of his son, he explained the hardships of living in such conditions. This place was (and still is) at the outskirts of Nuevo Laredo.

Nuevo Laredo is considered an international trade hub, where goods and people pass through from the US into Mexico and vice-versa. Because of its strategic position it has attracted the best riches can get and the worst poverty can summon. This the dark side of this city and the whole of the US-Mexico border. A couple of miles from this place the United States begin.

When I presented this at my university in the American side, they were baffled and even incredulous that such scenes could exist on the other side of the river where they live, work and sleep.

If you’re interested in Mexico and inequality you should look into my novel, Till Stars Shut Their Eyes.

Family at Mexican border. Copyright 2006 Miguel Omaña.
Family at Mexican border. Copyright 2006 Miguel Omaña.

Mexican senate taken by police

This was the moment armed Federal Police took hold of the Mexican Senate’s main entrance from the ire of hundreds of thousands of protesters and anarchists. Even though they took the Senate well in the night, it was about this moment of the day that hundreds of Federal Policemen completely took the Senate inside out. This was before the controversial landmark education bill was passed. A block away, at Reforma and Bucareli junction, all-out anarchists clashed with other Federal Policemen, resulting in injuries. The protesters chanted for an uprise, and threatened to take over Mexico City.

Photo taken in 2013, but since then, this type of action have become common not only in Mexico City but mainly in Southern states.

For centuries people in Mexico have attempted to fight for freedom and basic rights. The notorious Mexican Revolution is an example of it. And yet, even before the arrival of Europeans to then called Anahuac, people have fought against injustice or their rights. One such example is the war led by Yacanex, which I explain in my novel Till Stars Shut Their Eyes how he fought for their rights against the ambitions of the powerful.

Mexican Senate taken by police. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Mexican Senate taken by police. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.