Category Archives: mobile photography

Ants Macro World

Photo I shot with my cellphone using a macro lens adapter, at Lake Casablanca in Laredo, Texas.

This is my first time I use such an adapter for a mobile.

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Outside the Museum of Anthropology

Street photography I shot with my J7 mobile phone, outside the National Museum of Anthropology and History. 

The Museum is not only a great visit because of the treasures it houses — literal treasured pieces, monuments like the Aztec Calendar stone, unique statues, glyphs listing kings, and gold craftsmanship — but for its location.

It is a huge and ancient forest designed by Nezahualcoyotl.

At the heart of an upscale area of Mexico City, the National Museum of Anthropology and History rises amongst a forest of trees. On one side of the museum, you have the Chapultepec Forest (or Bosque de Chapultepec). The equivalent of Mexico City’s Central Park, it is a huge and ancient forest — designed by King Nezahualcoyotl of Texcoco for his Aztec Mexica cousin King Motecuhzoma I — which recieves tourists and locals from all walks of life. You can find Mexican families flocking with their improvised picnic a la mexicana, or you can stumble upon elegant couples who march with haste towards some classical music concert. If you like being surrounded with people — and most of all seeing all kinds of them — this is a great spot.

Dotted with posh bars.

On the other side of the museum you have the Polanco district (or colonia Polanco), where you can find not only embassies, high-class hotels, or offices, but also a lot of cafe places, and international cuisine restaurants from around the world. Nightlife may be even more interesting in Polanco, since it is dotted with posh bars and exclusive restaurants.

Our version of the White House but more sumptuous (unfortunately).

The location of the museum is quite interesting not only because of its peaceful trees in the heart of Mexico City’s chaos, but because of its proximity to power. You see, quite near, just blocks away, you have the official Presidential house — sort of our version of the White House but more sumptuous (unfortunately for the Mexican people). We call it Los Pinos, or The Pinetrees (for real). And between Los Pinos complex and the Museum we have the National Auditorium, which is like our Madison Square Garden — all things concerts happen there (as well as quinceañera limos hanging cruising around Reforma Avenue).

Tortas are like burgers, but bigger and with way more ingredients.

Curiously enough, at the immediate surroundings of the museum we can find a lot of snack vendors, selling esquites (corn in a cup), tortas (like burgers but bigger and with way more ingredients), raspas (sno-balls), chicharrones (pork skin), and more. If you’re lucky you may see native dancers — you can’t miss them with all their feathery display.

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Mexico City metro area — what is it?

Photo I shot at Cuautitlan, Mexico.

Mexico City metro area is gigantic. Not only it spans over a large area but it’s also over-populated. There is a Federal District, locally known as DF — Mexico City proper. Surrounding it is the other metropolitan area in the State of Mexico.

Outside the DF limits there are 22 municipalities, to explain each one is a hard task (perhaps for another post). Each has its goodies and its bad sides, as with any place.

The northern municipalities of Mexico City’s metro area is the more vast, it encompass Teotihuacan pyramids for instance. We could divide it in Northeastern and Northwestern, all beyonf the Guadalupe Sierra mountains. Tepotzotlan and Cuautitlan are here. Before the mountains there are other municipalities as well.

Then you have the western municipalities, more posh and upscale. They’re best attractions are the pine forests. Yes, in Mexico we have forests, sorry to dissappoint Hollywood.

On the East, behind the airport we have small towns that also have ancient ruins and yearly fairs.

Finally there’s the Chalco region and volcanoes, where the main attractions are obvious although there are also beautiful colonial towns and breathtaking landscapes.

If you’re interested in Mexico, check out my novel set in Ancient Mexico. Till Stars Shut Their Eyes, a romance and political thriller based on true events.

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Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico

Photo I shot at Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico.

A few minutes away from the bustling San Miguel de Allende town is Dolores, in the center of Guanajuato state and in the hearts of many Mexicans. It is after all the birthplace of modern Mexico.

Today is a calm town, but already heading to be a touristy place like its neighbors San Miguel, Leon, or Guanajuato city.

Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.

Worlds within worlds.

Mobile photograph I shot at a small patch of garden on the sidewalk, in Mexico City.

It is amazing how one can easily find worlds within our own world. As I was walking, an activity which I am so fond of, I discovered these mushrooms still with morning dew. Perhaps our own world is also embedded within a colossal one, one so large the entire cosmos wouldn’t suffice. After all, for ants their world seems large enough, ignoring there are supernovas and black holes bending space-time.

Worlds within worlds. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Worlds within worlds. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.

The anticipation

Street photography I shot at Mexico City metro area, in public transportation.

There is beauty that goes beyond expensive cosmetics or posh clothes, a beauty that emerges from the soul and youth. And youth just like a flower is gorgeous for an ephemeral time, and then fades leaving a wake of mementos. But the young don’t care, they just anticipate the future without realizing it is they who are at the pinnacle of life.

The anticipation. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
The anticipation. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.

Mexico City’s Alameda park.

Mobile Photo I shot at Mexico City’s downtown, in the Alameda park.

It is located within walking distance from the rest of Mexico City’s historic downtown — what was once the Mexica Aztec capital — and upscale Reforma Avenue. The Alameda has the Fine Arts Palace in its grounds, and posh hotels around it.

One of the oldest parks of Mexico City, it once went to a deplorable state for many decades (as with all forgotten urban jewels in the world). Just last year the Alameda was recovered to what it might have looked in its full glory during the last centuries.

The towering Latinoamericana Tower is the tallest building that stands in the downtown area of the Mexican capital — the reason — the dangerous marshy land in which the area is located. Once an island, the Aztec Mexica capital of Mexico Tenochtitlan was surrounded with water. Actually the Aztec Mexica streets were water causeways like in Venice, except for the few connecting roads to “mainland”. As the city sprawled, the marshy lands and Aztec ruins became the foundation for the new city. This part of the city can’t have tall buildings for that reason, and to have the Latinoamericana Tower standing there, already sustaining strong earthquakes like the one in 1985, is called by architects and engineers a feat.

But fate shall not be tempted, and so taller and shinier buildings are standing in Reforma Avenue (and still more being erected) away from the zone. One can walk from Alameda Park to the nation’s most famous avenue, locally known as Paseo de la Reforma, where more hotels, shops, malls, and monuments are located.


If you like history and places of Mexico, you may enjoy my novel Till Stars Shut Their Eyes.

Mexico City's Alameda Park. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Mexico City’s Alameda Park. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.