Category Archives: Mexican girl

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chavacomiendopizzaizcalli_by_photo_tlacuilopilo-dbwkujyCandid street photography I shot at Guadalupe Lake, Mexico.

This girl is eating pizza by a lake where people gather during the weekends for a stroll, horse-backriding, or enjoy nature’s scenery. During weekdays, people go there to jog or related activities. There are places to eat nearby, especially during the weekends, when people go and visit.

Mexico is the true land of contrasts.

It is ironic that people from all classes share together this huge place, but the lake itself is located in a very upscale residential area — where huge mansions have a view (or even a piece) of the lake. But families from all walks of life gather there to do some picnic, or just relax. Mexico is the true land of contrasts, and this place speaks for itself.

Guadalupe Lake (or Lago de Guadalupe) is located at Cuautitlan Izcalli, in northern Mexico City metro area. A great place to shot sunset photographs, nature pictures, and of course street and candid photos.

Chava mexicana con la boca abierta metiendosela por la boca.

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Female Volleyball of Nuevo Laredo

Photos I shot of Volleyball girls playing at a local league match in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

A city known for other things than volleyball, it lives a strong subculture around this sport — one that trascends class, gender, or even age.

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A vibrant subculture.

For many years now, decades, Nuevo Laredo has been known to international news outlets for its gritty violence and the colossal volume of import-export commerce that crosses through this border. And it is true — both statements would even fall short. But none would realize that amid local struggles (sometimes created by international ones) there is a vibrant subculture for volleyball.

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An impression that would go down the Rio Grande.

Girls and boys alike immerse themselves (almost religiously) into this sport. Its fast-paced action would seem to require a high degree of agility, quick reaction… and youth. Swiftly, that impression would go down the Rio Grande once you see all the matches — adults, short, or even the elderly join these local league tournaments.

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Perhaps the real future for Nuevo Laredo lies in sports.

Perhaps it is a way to escape of all troubles happening at border. After all, Nuevo Laredo and Laredo, Texas are the twin cities located in the epicenter of immigration struggles and the ilk. As ill fated as the future may seem for Nuevo Laredo, perhaps the real future lies in sports such as volleyball. As a way to escape from everyday issues in this bordertown. Or perhaps — and this may have more sense than any of my anthropological dissections — it is the love for the game.

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Beautiful hot girls volleyball players. Sexy mexican teen girls, tight butts, asses. Chavas de Nuevo Laredo, bonitas hermosas nalgonas, nalgas, culos, colegialas. 

Mexico City Public Transportation 101

Photo I shot at Mexico City metro area.

In Mexico City suburban areas and the inner city have different kinds of public transportation. In the Federal District, which is Mexico City proper, there is a vast subway, metrobus, trolebus, normal buses, cabs, electric cabs, tricycle cabs, a small commuting train, and a long interstate commuting train that connects with the State of Mexico northern municipalities.

In the surrounding area of the Federal District, locally known as Distrito Federal or simply DF, there is of course the commuting train, cabs, mexibus, normal buses, and what locals call combis (which are glorified minivans that swarm the almost 21 municipalities that surround Mexico City).

The one in the picture is known as a micro (pronounced mee-cro), which usually are outdated American buses from yesteryear. These micros roam in the metro area, while buses usually connect to Mexico City downtown.

Mexico City inhabitants and yours truly have to undergo the intricate public transport at some point. American cities are more car oriented but the Mexican capital is enormous and overpopulated that at times it makes its avenues and expressways useless because of epic traffic jams. After all, this is the third largest urban agglomeration of the world. Hence, its mobility problems are far greater and more challenging than way (way) smaller cities like New York or New Delhi.

I have crossed the whole city from one city limit to the other using only public transportation, it took me a bit more than 4 hours. And I was lucky, because I avoided rush hour. I did the same time one makes from Mexico City to Acapulco beach by car.

If you’re interested in Mexico City and its history, check out my book Till Stars Shut Their Eyes.

Girl on Public Transport. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.
Girl on Public Transport. Copyright 2015 Miguel Omaña.

Jicama vendor at Mexico City

Photo I shot at Mexico City metropolitan area. The urban sprawl is so huge that it encompasses several states. Public transportation varies from place to place within the greater Mexico City area to be able to cover all districts and boroughs.

At public transportation key places where routes link it is common to see street vendors and eateries. You can find tortas (the equivalent of hamburgers made out of french bread) as low as 1 dollar*, or amaranth bars (the ones they sell you at posh nutritional store elsewhere in the world) as low as 50 US cents*.

In this case this gorgeous lady sells jicama, which is not only nutritional but low-fat. She sells them cut and already ready set to-go. In other places they make their form as lollipops, called jicaretas. But in general you can have them prepared with chilli powder, chilli sauce, lemon, etcetera. Long ago they carried them out in the open, but now most jicama and fruit vendors display them inside a glass-protected case.

When in doubt, whenever you are going to buying food or fruit, be sure to ask them how do they prepare it. It varies from place to place, and one can learn more about how to eat it.

* Prices are given according to current peso-US dollar conversion.

Jicama vendor at Mexico City. Copyright 2013 Miguel Omaña. Jicama vendor at Mexico City. Copyright 2013 Miguel Omaña.